My Journey into “At Home in the Whole Food Kitchen”

childhood: eating peaches outside in the summer


As a mom and growing Foodie, it’s hard to not reminisce about my childhood and the food I ate, the way my mom cooked, or the foods that just brought me pure joy when they were placed on the dinner table. Foods that still take me back to childhood when I taste or smell them. I didn’t grow up in a home where whole foods were the focus. I grew up with two working parents, and a mom that tried her hardest to put a quality meal on the table for dinner. But a lot of our food was made from a box, can or a package. And there was always meat on our plate. We would typically have cereal and orange juice for breakfast during the school week. And a sandwich, chips and cookies for lunch at school. That’s just the way it was in our house. The foods I remember growing up, the ones I have the most for fondest memories of, are foods that a vegan food blogger would never right about. My mom would make pulled beef and pickle sandwiches in the crockpot a lot, and served them on an onion bun. It was delicious, and I always put ketchup and Frank’s Red Hot on them. I considered that my mom’s signature meal. I remember when in elementary school, on Mondays my brother, sister and I would stay in the after school program, which means my mom would get Taco Bell on her way to pick us up. It was a luxury for us to eat out, so I made sure my order was perfect for me every time, and of course enough food to satisfy my longing for it. I also remember packing a 6 inch Spicy Italian subway sandwich with mayo, black pepper and jalapeño into a cooler and take it to Water World with me every summer. I can literally taste it as I am writing this. And I also remember getting greasy, crispy French fries and nacho cheese sauce at Water World as well. I couldn’t wait to have those. I also remember eating rice and red hot during my eating issues days, and Quizzno’s tuna subs dipped in their signature Italian dressing as a staple lunch during high school. I remember eating Chipotle for the very first time, my mom would bring 3 burritos home for dinner after work, and she would cut them in half and the four of us would split them. You know, back in the day when no one could ever eat a whole burrito! I remember my dad frying up potatoes in a pan, and grilling steak for dinner on Saturday nights. And I remember when my mom was on a “health” kick, we would eat grilled chicken with wing sauce (Frank’s Red Hot and butter), potatoes and garlic bread. Lastly, I remember my mom’s pancakes on Saturday morning, these thick, borderline undercooked pancakes she would fry in the leftover bacon grease from the bacon she cooked in the pan prior to making the pancakes. There was always a bacon flavored crisp on the outside of the pancakes. 

You’re probably wondering where I’m going with this. All this meat talk on a vegan blog. Well, I have been in love with this cookbook, as in can’t get enough of reading it and dissecting everything about it, love it. The author in the introduction describes her childhood as it relates to food, the memories of how her mom would cook, and her own food journey. Amy Chaplin, in her cookbook “At Home in the Whole Food Kitchen”, paints such a wonderful picture of how she came to know, love and appreciate food. 

Chaplin grew up in Australia with vegetarian parents, who lived off the land they lived on and they would cook everything that they ate. She writes ” My sister and I were involved in everything my parents did: keeping bees, brewing ginger beer, making tofu, molding the mud bricks to build the house, creating biodynamics preparations for the property, and grinding wheat into flour. We were also part of the process of planting, harvesting and cooking the foods that we ate; and inevitability composting our food scraps…Besides growing fruits, vegetables, and herbs on our land, my parents ordered bulk grains, nuts, seeds, dried fruits and olive oil, which sat in jars on a big old dresser in the kitchen. The image of those jars filled with wholesome ingredients has been central to inspiring me to create new recipes over these many years as a chef”. 

Those are such beautiful words! They inspire me so to give a life similar to that to my kids. Will my kids see me cooking their food in their memories as an adult, and how I would involve them in the creation of their food? Will they remember learning how to cook with me, teaching them to measure, chop, stir, fold or follow a recipe, and loving how I let them taste the food as we cooked? I hope so. I hope I can provide a love and appreciation of food to my kids. I truly do. And I hope my kids’ childhood food memories are different than mine. I wouldn’t give my childhood up for anything, but wish I knew about the importance of the food we choose to eat back then. And I wish I would have cooked more with my parents as a child, just to have those memories and knowledge!

Chaplin authored a cookbook chalked full of whole food recipes, including a pantry essential list and recipes from that list. 


Her attention to detail in everything she cooks is beautiful and genius. She is so careful with every ingredient she prepares and I am fascinated by her process. I wish I could pick her brain for an afternoon over tea and home made bread! 

I bought her cookbook about a year or so ago at the store Anthropologie, my home away from home, where I spend all of our money and drive my hubby crazy! Her book and her life just speak to my inner foodie, and I have been longing to cook thru her cookbook. Which is exactly what I intend to do, and I’m planning on sharing it with you. With over 150 recipes, I will cook each one, sharing a little bit of my experience with you, and a little bit of what I learn about Amy Chaplin thru it, whether from her cookbook or her food. I am hoping to cook at least one recipe a week, but life sometimes gets in the way and I may not always be able to do so. I will not, however, share her recipes, because those are hers and if you want them, buy the book! Seriously, buy the book. It’s awesome. She is not a pure vegan, but she’s pretty darn close. She shares a love for goat cheese like I do 🤗

I’ve made her chocolate cake, and learned about agar agar for the first time. I’ve learned so much from her already in the handful of recipes I have made in the year I’ve had the cookbook. I am so excited to FINALLY be doing this! I will be starting off with her pantry recipes😋

Thanks for going on this food journey with me! 

Until next time…

Bon Appetit!